Smart Bytes®

Feeling nutrition info overload? I will help you sort through to find what’s important to you. Read more. . .

Subscribe to Blog

FREE Gift: Easy Nutrition Upgrades

Archives

sedentary lifestyle

Beyond High vs. Low: Is Glycemic Index Key to Healthy Carbs?

With recommendations to limit consumption of sugar and refined grains, and focus on “quality carbohydrate”, how can you choose foods that support your goal of healthy eating? Healthy Eating; Glycemix index or high vs low carbohydrate?

Is glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) the key? What about amount and types of fiber, prebiotics, or whole grains?

Without going overboard based on “health halos”, how can you identify and include quality carbs in your day-to-day eating habits? Here, in Part One

on choosing healthy sources of carbohydrates, we’ll look beyond the headlines at glycemic index….

Continue reading

Avoid Weight Loss Relapse: Strategic Synergy

As challenging as it is to lose weight, for many people an even more daunting problem is avoiding, or at least limiting, the weight regain that tends to follow. Metabolic adaptations may account for some weight regain, but many people find that relapse into old habits is clearly involved, too. Is there help beyond ironclad self-discipline?

Tracking your weight and targeting specific changes in eating, exercise and sitting time can both be powerful tools for weight loss. Previous Smart Bytes® posts featured interviews with Rebecca Krukowski, PhD, discussing research on frequency of weight checks and other behavior change tips for weight loss. Dr. Krukowski, a clinical psychologist on faculty at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, provides additional insights on tracking’s role in avoiding relapse in the video interview shared here.

After hearing from Dr. Krukowski, read on for my take on how new research presented an American Heart Association conference I recently attended can address the all-to-common problem of weight loss habits relapse, and help take maintaining a healthy weight from daunting to doable.

 

  Continue reading

How to Get the Most from an Activity Tracker: 9 Top Tricks

Does using a pedometer or other physical activity tracker work to help you get more active?

Move more, sit less to help prevent cancer

Sometimes a dog’s not enough to help you create a healthy lifestyle

One important point is choosing the right tracker for you. Even then, several tweaks in how you use it can make or break your likelihood of successful results.

Some people refer to their activity trackers as the cornerstone of getting and staying fit and healthy. Others try one, say “Meh”, and before long, it’s tucked away in a drawer, never again to see the light of day.

Here are 9 strategies for getting results….

Continue reading

“How am I NOT Losing Weight with All this Exercise?”

“How am I NOT losing weight?”

Weight loss - Is exercise enough?

“How am I NOT losing weight?”
It’s a common frustration.

Have you ever wondered that after boosting your activity with extra walking, swimming or other forms of exercise? You’re not alone. Sometimes it is hard to understand a lack of weight loss. Often, though, a little digging can uncover several potential reasons why weight is not dropping as quickly as you expect.

Identifying what’s going on allows you to adjust how you are approaching a healthy lifestyle.

Continue reading

Do You Need an Activity Tracker? How to Know, How to Choose

You’ve heard all about how important physical activity is for not just weight control, but for many aspects of health, and you’ve been trying to walk more often. So why would you want some sort of monitor to track your physical activity? That’s what I used to think. But now, for me and for many patients with whom I’ve worked, I know why.activity trackers show many Americans are sedentary

Yes, people have made headlines with reports that using a tracker led them to gain weight. However, there’s more to that story.

Although American adults are walking more, less than half of American adults (47%) reach the federal recommendation of at least 150 minutes each week of moderate aerobic activity (such as brisk walking), or 75 minutes per week of vigorous physical activity, or an equivalent combination.  That’s unfortunate, since these guidelines note more than this minimum brings even greater health benefits.

Here’s the clincher: The statistics illustrate exactly why I know I need an activity tracker — only 16.3% of American adults reach the oft-heard recommendation to accumulate at least 10,000 steps a day. In fact, 36.1% of American adults qualify as sedentary, defined as less than 5,000 steps a day.

How can nearly half of Americans get 30 minutes of activity most days, yet accumulate steps so much lower than you might think? If most of your day is spent sitting and at a low activity level, it takes more intentional activity to reach levels of activity associated with health.

Will an Activity Tracker Make a Difference?

Continue reading